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THE INTEGRITY OF GOD

 

 

 June 6, 2004

Trinity Sunday

 

 

 

 

“Integrity” is a word that signifies wholeness, with all of the parts of the whole working in harmony and striving for unity.  Each of the parts has its distinctive role to play, but no one part can play its proper role without the support and sustenance of all the related parts.  The integrity of a thing presupposes the very unity that it seeks. God does not love us more than he does the zealous Muslim or the radical secularist.  Why then do we build walls between ourselves and the people we call our enemies?  God enlightens us with one truth.  He empowers us with one faith.  He endears us with one love.  Most of us lack the courage to climb foot hills. Think how wonderful life would be if we shared a common faith, if we affirmed a common hope, and if we embraced a common love.  This utopian vision would certainly lie beyond reach were it not for the integrity of God.  As the source of all faith, hope and love, God is the Guarantor of every utterance of faith, and of every of every pulse of love.

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GOOD ENOUGH FOR GOD

 

 

 June 13, 2004

Feast of Corpus Christi

Giving offerings to God has been the core of worship since the earliest forms of religion.  Always the most valuable things were offered to God -- the first fruits of fields and pastures, the finest products of industry and artistry.  Each era of religiosity has struggled with the question: “What is good enough for God?” There is only one sacrifice that pleases God.  That one great gift to God is the life, death, and resurrection of his Son Jesus Christ.  “The Little Drummer Boy” has become a favorite for most of us in our list of Christmas Carols.  He came to the manger along side of kings, priests, and prophets.  But his meager gift outshone their treasures by far.  They gave out of their riches.  He gave out of his poverty. They gave of their possessions.  He gave himself alone -- the one gift good enough for God. 

 

 

 

 

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ALL DIFFERENT, ALL THE SAME

 

 

June 20, 2004

 Twelfth Sunday of the Year

 

 

 

 

Human knowledge broadly divides between two fields of learning – the sciences which explore and explain similar natural causes and effects and the Arts which delineate and celebrate different human  motives and meanings.  As human beings, we share many traits in common but each trait is given unique definition.  We share a species identity yet claim an individual identity. We are all brothers and sisters in the same Sprit of life and love that pushes us to a greater involvement with Him and with each other.  We weep at movies about love and thrill at the sentiments of love in our songs but we do not understand the meaning of love until we read it on the face of Jesus.  Give us such a life changing vision of him.  What would happen if the world suddenly became color blind?  We would lose our primary way of differentiating the “ins” and the “outs” from each other. How could something as ephemeral as skin coloring determine the fate of persons the world round?  The truth is, we would find something else to mark our superiority apart from others.  Some trait like size, or skill like language, or advantage like wealth would serve to arrange the world according to our prejudices.  Christ alone frees us from such self-centered and self-serving ways of viewing the world.

 

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THE BURDEN OF FREEDOM

 

 

June 27, 2004

Thirteenth Sunday of the Year

 

 

 

 

 

We are reminded daily of the terrible costs of freedom.  We must defend freedom against those who would enslave the world.  We must strengthen freedom for those who would liberate the world.  The costs of defending and strengthening freedom are beyond calculation.  How can we measure the value of human life, social systems, and cultural treasures spent in preserving peace? Christ made himself poor that we might be made rich by his poverty.  The promise of freedom is the Bible’s great gift to human history.  No ancient cultures set freedom as its highest good.  No ancient philosophy regarded freedom as its noblest virtue.  No ancient religion celebrated freedom as the gift of the gods. But the Bible has affirmed freedom as the “self-evident truth” of human nature that sustains our highest values and deepest certainties.

 

 

 

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A Eucharistic Community Since 1772

 

 

 

716 Mississippi Street PO Box 508 Donaldsonville, Louisiana 70346

225.473.3176 Fax 225.473.3256

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